Sex arbik

Duration: 5min 19sec Views: 1609 Submitted: 14.05.2020
Category: Double Penetration
Tags: sex+arbik
The result is an informative, insightful, and engaging account of this sensitive and still largely secret aspect of Arab society. Sexual attitudes and behaviors are shaped by politics and economics, religion and tradition, gender and generations—not only a reflection of the conditions that led to the uprisings, but also a measure of hard-won reforms in the years to come. Highly personal, rich with original research and remarkable stories, Sex and the Citadel gives us unprecedented and timely insight into a part of the world that is changing before our eyes. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

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In the Arab Bedroom: The Sex Life of Arabs

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. A haunting and beautifully composed book. It blew my mind.

Sex and society in a changing Arab world

Over the past year, I have criss-crossed the Arab world for the BBC, making a series of short films on some of the women and men who are rewriting the rules - in and out of the bedroom. It's easy to look at the sexual landscape of the Middle East and North Africa and see only doom and gloom, from family preoccupation with female virginity to crackdowns on LGBTQ populations to media censorship ostensibly in response to online porn. Such hardline attitudes are reflected in opinion polls, such as the recent survey for BBC News Arabic of 10 countries in the region and the Palestinian Territories. Carried out by the Arab Barometer research network, the survey generated a few surprises - most respondents, for instance, accepted a woman's right to lead their country - but the overall picture was conservative and closed-minded on matters of sex and gender. Most still think the husband should have the final say on family matters, and "honour killing" is deemed more acceptable than homosexuality in six of the seven places where this question was asked.
The initial hypothesis of the researchers was that the different languages and the different readership of these magazines would be major factors accounting for possible differences. Fifteen articles from the relationship advice sections of each magazine were selected for this study. Both semantic and latent approaches were used in the analysis of themes in order to analyse not just what is foregrounded by these texts but also what is backgrounded or omitted.